greencarnations:

cinematicsymphony:

This is so accurate. At school, we literally have children who will watch our facial expressions to see if them falling is as bad as they think it might be.

CORRECT CHILD INJURY PROCEDURE:

  • do not react. at the most, maybe wince and go “ooooh”
  • go over to the child to assess panic level and severity of injury
  • if they’re like, dying, remain calm, but they’re probably not.
  • look them in the eye and ask, “you okay?” they will nod. possibly all teary-eyed. then ask, “are we gonna need to cut it off?”
  • the child is thrown off. if they giggle, you’re in the money. if they do not, put a bandaid on and do some sympathetic patting. they are probably a little teary. let the sad little bug sit out for a minute. they will quickly get bored.
  • works every time

kiercetheveil:

prokopetz:

You were so focused on whether you COULD do it, you never stopped to ask whether you SHOULD.” - Ian Malcolm, Jurassic Park

the quote made it

Languages animate objects by giving them names, making them noticeable when we might not otherwise be aware of them. Tuvan has a word iy (pronounced like the letter e), which indicates the short side of a hill.

I had never noticed that hills had a short side. But once I learned the word, I began to study the contours of hills, trying to identify the iy. It turns out that hills are asymmetrical, never perfectly conical, and indeed one of their sides tends to be steeper and shorter than the others.

If you are riding a horse, carrying firewood, or herding goats on foot, this is a highly salient concept. You never want to mount a hill from the iy side, as it takes more energy to ascend, and an iy descent is more treacherous as well. Once you know about the iy, you see it in every hill and identify it automatically, directing your horse, sheep, or footsteps accordingly.

This is a perfect example of how language adapts to local environment, by packaging knowledge into ecologically relevant bits. Once you know that there is an iy, you don’t really have to be told to notice it or avoid it. You just do. The language has taught you useful information in a covert fashion, without explicit instruction.

- K. David Harrison, The Last Speakers (via perugu—-annam)

I was recently doing some stand up at a club. After one of my sets, I walked into the bar where a friend of mine who is a comic and also happens to be a tall and pretty lady was standing with a few other people. They were having an animated discussion.

The guy at the bar – whom I had never met before – looked at me and saw my glasses, my ill fitting clothes, my bad posture, and I guess he saw in me a kindred spirit.

“Here,” he said, “this guy will get it. Dude, don’t you think hot girls have it easiest in the world?”

I answered without thinking. My words vomited up out of me.

“No, not at all,” I said. “Being a hot girl seems awful.”

He laughed.

“No, I’m not kidding,” I said. “Why does it suck to look like you and me? Because hot girls won’t talk to us when we’re dumb teenagers… I’d rather have that then spend my whole life with guys yelling shit at me when I walk down the street. I’d rather be lonely for a few years early on then spend every day getting creeped out by gross dudes staring at my chest when I’m just trying to go to the supermarket to buy some fucking vegetables.”

“Yeah,” he said, “but they get whatever they want all the time.”

“Do they?” I asked. “I’m sure they get into clubs I can’t get into, or get drinks served to them without waiting as long as I have to. But they also get judged for wearing the clothes they wear. Or get pressured for not putting out. Or have to worry constantly, at least a little in the back of their mind, about getting raped.”

The guy just stared at me.

“I don’t know dude,” I said. “Hot girls don’t have it easy.”

My friend who is tall and pretty looked at me and smirked and said, “Good answer.” And we walked away together.

Hot girls don’t have it easy. They don’t have it easy for all those reasons I told that guy, and so many more. But most of all, they don’t have it easy because dummies like that guy look at them and see them as “hot girls” instead of seeing them as “three dimensional human beings.”

And that’s what drives me nuts about “the good guys”.

“I’m a good guy, why don’t hot chicks like me?” Are you really a good guy when you say shit like “hot chicks”?

“I’m a nice guy, girls don’t pay any attention to me.” Are you sure you’re a nice guy? Because if your main concern is getting girls to pay attention to you for how nice you are, it sounds to me like maybe you’re not actually nice and you’re presenting yourself as nice to trick a girl you crave into thinking you’re nice. And that’s not very nice.

-

Chris Gethard, from “Overcome Your Programming And Be A Better Man

Just: read the whole piece. Thanks to wallflowercabaret for posting about it on Facebook.

(via gretagrwigs)

gaaaaaaaaaambit:

screenshot redraw

winjennster:

destielpasta:

Omg look it’s two female characters with a purpose and emotions and BONUS they also mirror the lead two boys perfectly… I know what we should do. Let’s kill ‘em.

It’s important to note one thing about Jo and Ellen’s deaths.
Season five was intended by Kripke and all parties as the FINAL SEASON.
He was killing off everyone around Sam and Dean because the show was coming to an end.

i understand; but at the same time; there were misogynistic undertones the entire 5 seasons; so; hm;

penicillium-pusher:

"The A stands for allies!"

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"But we’re part of the LGBTQ comm-"

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"They don’t even feel attrac-"

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trappedinsanity:

The girls are having none of your shit.

awwww-cute:

We recently adopted a couple of kittens. This one, Starbuck, enjoys chewing on books

theme